Anxiety Levels of Nursing Students Toward Profession

One of the major demands in terms of current research studies on the matter of nursing concerns their relevance in both social and professional contexts. Hence, the vast majority of today’s studies focus on the nursing implications under the pressure of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, the research article chosen for the present overview is cited as follows:

The primary goal of the present article is to define the scope of interconnection between the current context of medical practice overwhelmed with challenges and risks and the level of nursing students’ anxiety. The present study is primary quantitative research that presents a hypothesis of the existence of a relationship between the ongoing pandemic and nursing students’ anxiety concerning their willingness to become practitioners. The sample for the study was selected through the mass mailing of the online questionnaire among the medical students in three cities in Turkey. The sample constituted a total of 510 nursing students, yet only 89% of the respondents eventually reacted to the questionnaire.

The further analysis of the responses encompassed an exhaustive number of variables, including school, gender, year of study, the level of willingness to choose the profession. Additionally, there were various options concerning one’s perception of pandemics and its contribution to the desire to change the profession. The results of the study indicated that there was no explicit correlation between the levels of anxiety and pandemic. However, it was established during the study that one’s independent willingness to become a nurse accounted for a considerable decrease in the overall anxiety levels. Hence, it may be concluded that the research article described used a beneficial approach to sampling data, as the explicit questionnaire that included different variables eventually not only justified the hypothesis but found additional evidence on the levels of anxiety among nursing students.