Promotion Realities in Nursing

In the case under discussion, Ms. Johnson, an RN with a three-year-old experience, is assumed to the position of the director of nursing and the nursing home administrator. However, to accept this proposition, the nurse has to analyze the situation and investigate all possible benefits and shortages of this change. According to Tabloski (2014), the proportions of older people continue growing, and the long-term care services for patients at nursing homes undergo substantial improvements. The realities Ms. Johnson should consider her potential responsibilities, readiness for the offered amount of work, and the risks for her as a graduate nurse and for the facility.

The director of nursing and the nursing home administrator are two different positions that require specific certificates. Her responsibilities as an administrator are financial management, staffing reports, and the control of the physical environment (Shin, 2019). If Mr. Johnson does not have a bachelor’s degree in service/business administration, her qualification for this position is questioned. At the same time, using outside sources, Shin (2019) discovered that about 40% of directors in nursing and administrators leave their positions because of different reasons during the first year. Therefore, the risk of the nurse is a low level of satisfaction with a position, the necessity of taking a wide range of responsibilities, and the possibility of losing her job. The facility has the same risk of not having a qualified candidate for the offered position.

There are also benefits for the nurse and the facility connected with the promotion. The increase in salary, the development of professional skills, and control over other nurses in the nurse home become available for Mr. Johnson. A new leader, who is aware of the current regulations and standards of long-term care, is a significant benefit for the facility as well. In general, if the facility accepts the idea of the chosen nurse’s promotion, it means that the qualification of the nurse of appropriate. Not to regret about the decision made, Mr. Johnson has to manage her time and cooperate with the staff in a highly professional way.

References

Shin, J. H. (2019). Nursing staff characteristics on resident outcomes in nursing homes. The Journal of Nursing Research, 27(1), 1-9.

Tabloski, P. (2014). Gerontological nursing (3rd Ed). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Health Science.