Nursing Management: Legislative Framework

Legislations on nursing practice

Legislations on nursing practice.all countries have legislation to determine the practice of the health professions. Legislative and regulatory practices and mechanism vary between countries and within them, where regulation is the responsibility of a country or province. Countries such as Norway have detailed requirements for mandatory licensure for practice. Other countries such as the Netherlands allow nursing to be practiced any individual provided they don’t use the designation “nurse” except for the qualified people. The underlying principles of governing the profession are of universal application (Philips, 2005).

Issues/problems in the nursing profession

Nurses are changing to other places of employment and professions due to low income and harsh working environment (Glazer, 1991; Heather, 1996).

Scope of nursing practice is currently wide from health care, general public hospital, nursing home care and private hospitals owned by the private sector. There are opportunities in the schools, colleges and universities also in the researching firms.

Scope of nursing practice

Scope of nursing practice is currently wide from health care, general public hospital, nursing home care and private hospitals owned by the private sector. There are opportunities in the schools, colleges and universities also in the researching firms.

Unreasonable and anti-competitive requirements that produce no demonstrable benefits should be struck down.

For nurses to be competent in the clinical care of patients, they will have to remain updated with knowledge and alter the practices. Equally important to keeping their profession competent is how the nurses manage the multitude of professional issues. Their obligation as faculty and competent nurses is to create challenges for engaging in professional issues for the new generation of nurses. By ensuing that graduate learners gain a beginning trajectory of career and policy development, we influence several nurses in advancing nursing roles and promote an informed group of nurses to continue the profession’s work on behalf of nurses, nursing and the public.

The national Practitioner’s data Bank is a federal computerized directory of records of state disciplinary actions against nurses and malpractice suits that result in payments. However, consumers do not have access to information that has been maintained by the Data Bank. According to members of the American Medical Association and other defenders of this prohibition, the information may be misleading because the number of malpractice awards may reflect a high-risk specialty and not a total measure of professional incompetence.

Complaint/Disciplinary process

Complaint/disciplinary process of the nurses are undertaken in the various stated process. The first is in accordance with the code of ethics laid down by the nursing profession. The other bit is in the registered union of nurses for the complaining. Nursing act is used for the disciplinary process.

Glazer, S. (1991). “How Much Do You Know About Your Doctor?’ Washington Post Health, vol. 114, no.90, pp.10-12.

Consumers are limited in their access to information about their physicians. Many have to rely upon referrals from relatives and friends. Even when consumers consult their state board of medicine, they are often only given information about finalized disciplinary actions taken against a nurse. They are typically not told about pending malpractice suits, even when they are final court judgments and settlements, unless the lawsuit is directly related to a board disciplinary action.

Annotated Bibliography on nursing practice

Heather, M. (1996). “Critical Reflections about Professional Ethical Stance: Have We Lost Sight of the Major Objectives?” 35 Journal of Nursing Education. 119-126.

The author stated that nurses are changing to other places of employment and professions due to low income and harsh working environment.

Legislations on nursing practice.all countries have legislation to determine the practice of the health professions. Legislative and regulatory practices and mechanism vary between countries and within them, where regulation is the responsibility of a country or province. Countries such as Norway have detailed requirements for mandatory licensure for practice. Other countries such as the Netherlands allow nursing to be practiced any individual provided they don’t use the designation “nurse” except for the qualified people. The underlying principles of governing the profession are of universal application.

Massaro, T. M. and Thomas L. O. (1983). “Constitutional Limitations on State-Imposed Continuing Competency Requirements for Licensed Professionals.”William & Mary Law Review, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 253-312.

Morally responsible nursing practice requires that nurses know and examine their own values as well as the codified and emerging values of the discipline. Although it is important for nurses to be aware of the dramatic dilemmas that frequently accompany crises at the beginning and end of life, they must also be sensitive to their history and are encountered every day. For example, changing staffing patterns in hospitals frequently raise issues of safety and effectiveness of nursing care. Error in medicine, nursing, and health care is a grave, international concerns that is being addressed collaboratively by professional organizations. Several states have crafted safe staffing legislation as a response to the unsafe conditions created by inadequate staffing and mandatory overtime. Fagin, C. (2000). Essay on nursing leadership. New York: Springer Publishing Co.

One way in which a consumer can acquire some level of assurance that the physician they are choosing is competent by determining whether they have stuff investigative official said that hospitals won’t allow incompetent nurses to join the stuff.

Fiesta, J. (1993). ”Why Nurses lose their licenses- Part 2.” Nursing Management, Vol.24, no.12, pp. 14-16.

Many state boards of nursing report chemical dependency as the leading cause of disciplinary proceedings. Nurses who abuse drugs or alcohol while rendering nurses services often face license revocation for unprofessional conduct.

If nurses obtain drugs under a non-existent patient’s name or one who has not been prescribed a particular drug, they often face charges of fraud in the practice of nursing. The Pennsylvia Supreme Court Disciplinary activities held that fraud in practice is not limited to conduct directly affecting the care of patients, but encompasses “all aspects of professional conduct.”

While most boards try to select actions that will encourage nurses to seek help for drug and alcohol addictions, a board‘s primary responsibility is to prevent harm to patients.

While most nurses face disciplinary proceedings for drug or alcohol abuse or unprofessional conduct, they may also be disciplined for forging a physician’s name on a patient’s chart to obtain a drug for another patient. Other reasons may include the following: the unauthorized use of someone’s bureau of narcotic and drug registration number, permitting and instructing another to work as a registered nurse and patient abuse.

Reference List

Fiesta, J. (1993). ”Why Nurses lose their licenses- Part 2.” Nursing Management, Vol.24, no.12, 1993, pp. 14-16.

Glazer, S. (1991). “How Much Do You Know About Your Doctor?’ Washington Post Health, vol. 114, no.90, pp.10-12.

Heather, M. (1996). “Critical Reflections about Professional Ethical Stance: Have We Lost Sight of the Major Objectives?” 35 Journal of Nursing Education, 119-126.

Massaro, T, M. and Thomas L. O. (1983). “Constitutional Limitations on State-Imposed Continuing Competency Requirements for Licensed Professionals.”William & Mary Law Review, vol. 25, no. 2, pp. 253-312.

Philips, S.J. (2005). A comprehensive look at the legislative issues affecting advanced nursing practice. The Nurse Practioners, 30(1), 14-47.