Parents’ Responsibility for Children’s Medical Care

A key area of ​​medical care for children is the active monitoring of children’s health and the implementation of comprehensive preventive measures. The medical needs of children with disabilities should be taken into account. These actions require the involvement of a large number of medical workers, and, accordingly, funds and medical insurance. Not every family can pay for expensive treatment, especially if measures must be taken promptly. The purpose of this work is to determine the degree of parents’ responsibility in the framework of medical support for children.

The degree of responsibility of parents who want to protect or cure their child, unfortunately, directly depends on the level of income in the family. In this sense, commercial and private charitable foundations assist children with serious illnesses. Researchers note that it is impossible to say with confidence that parents deliberately refuse to help children (Bridge, 2019). People with limited incomes are trying to save on everything: education, food, clothing, and health.

According to Cohodes, Grossman, Kleiner, and Lovenheim (2016), the only exceptions are those cases when the mother or father consciously denies the apparent problem related to the health of their children. However, this is a question of a psychological or psychiatric nature.

The role of a family with a child with disabilities is growing immeasurably. Parents can and should become an active subject of influence on the corrective, medical, and educational components throughout the entire period of care for sick children. Programs should appear that focus on the introduction of modern technologies for interaction with families having a “special” child. A family bringing up a child with disabilities requires individual support provided by highly qualified specialists.

References

Bridge, G. (2019). Parents as care managers: The experiences of those caring for young children with cerebral palsy. New York, NY: Routledge.

Cohodes, S. R., Grossman, D. S., Kleiner, S. A., & Lovenheim, M. F. (2016). The effect of child health insurance access on schooling: Evidence from public insurance expansions. Journal of Human Resources, 51(3), 727-759.