Patient Safety Project Findings Dissemination

The main problem addressed by the practicum project plan is patient safety. It is defined by the absence of preventable harm to individuals who receive emergency or medical care. Relative to this assertion, the World Health Organization (2019) posits that about 25% of patients who seek health services are often harmed in the process. Three main objectives guided the investigation. They aimed to improve medication and diagnostics safety, prevent unnecessary emergency department hospital admissions and improve patient data privacy. The project setting was the healthcare environment where patients receive emergency and medical services and the proposed intervention focused on improving team collaboration standards to promote safety standards. Project objectives will be met by enhancing the level of coordination among healthcare teams, sharing decision-making responsibilities, promoting cooperation among healthcare workers, and nurturing partnerships.

Comparatively, the outcomes will be evaluated through peer review assessments, appraising patient satisfaction standards, comparing hospital admission rates, and reviewing patients’ feedback. Alternatively, the potential outcomes for the process include the minimization of potential exposures to harm, a reduction of medical errors, and lower litigation costs. Overall, the project helped me to understand the need to enhance organizational leadership capacity to minimize the incidence of preventable harm caused by poor coordination among healthcare staff and support collaboration in the healthcare environment as a prerequisite to the global push for universal health coverage (Piña et al., 2015; World Health Organization, 2019). The key tenets of the practicum project plan explained in this document are based on the recommendations of Sawatzky (2011), Russell and Ponferrada (2012).

References

Piña, I. L., Cohen, P. D., Larson, D. B., Marion, L. N., Sills, M. R., Solberg, L. I., & Zerzan, J. (2015). A framework for describing health care delivery organizations and systems. American Journal of Public Health, 105(4), 670-9. Web.

Russell, C. L., & Ponferrada, L. (2012).How to develop an outstanding conference research abstract. Nephrology Nursing Journal, 39(4), 307-342.

Sawatzky, J. V. (2011). My abstract was accepted – now what? A guide to effective conference presentations. Canadian Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, 21(2), 37-41.

World Health Organization. (2019). Patient safety. Web.