Cardiac Surgery in Elderly Patients: Strategies to Optimize Outcomes

The article under analysis is dedicated to the topic of cardiac surgery in elderly patients and the role of nurses in organizing and developing care programs needed by elderly patients after cardiac surgeries. In more detail, Rosborough (2006) argues that the proportion of people aged 80 and older is growing in the U.S., and so does the demand for cardiac surgery for these people (pp. 25 – 26). At the same time, specialists give no survival guarantee for elderly people after cardiac surgery and attribute great importance to nursing practices in increasing survival chances for 80+-year-old patients.

The consideration of the discussed article provides considerable useful information about the improvement of health care standards for elderly people in the United States. However, the article also leaves certain questions regarding this topic unanswered. For example, Rosborough (2006) argues that elderly patients often need cardiac surgery to reach their maximum life expectancy levels, but the author provides no evidence about the actual positive effects of cardiac surgery on patients of 80 years and older. What is the effect of cardiac surgery on patients of such age? Has it ever been researched? Are there actual chances for elderly people to survive without limiting their functionality? These are the questions the article by Rosborough (2006) leaves unanswered.

However, the considerable amount of useful information provided by this article makes it highly recommended reading that might enhance both students’ theoretical knowledge and practical skills in nursing practice. Specifically, the article under discussion gives direct instructions won hat a nurse should do while dealing with elderly patients after cardiac surgeries and why, thus serving as a clear and laconic guideline, especially for the beginning nurses.

References

Rosborough, D. (2006). Cardiac Surgery in Elderly Patients: Strategies to Optimize Outcomes. Critical Care Nurse, 26, 24 – 31.